Categories
Ramadan

Taking Medication (Birth Control Pills) in the Daytime of Ramadan

Question:

I am an unmarried female with some medical condition for which my doctors have ordered me to be on birth control pills. I have been taking them for the past 3 months and their timing is very strict; in other words, I have to take them at the exact time every day! I have been taking them at 4 p.m. and with Ramadan starting I do not know what to do. Please advise!

In the Name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful. All praise and thanks are due to Allah, and peace and blessings be upon His Messenger.

Fasting in Ramadan is one of the pillars of Islam. Failing to fast during the blessed month with no valid reason is a serious sin that a Muslim must avoid. So, you are advised to discuss with your doctor possible ways to safely delay the pills time until after breaking the fast (iftar).

In his response to your question, Sheikh Ahmad Kutty, a senior lecturer and Islamic scholar at the Islamic Institute of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, states the following:

It is my understanding that the timings for the pills are not inflexible, as people have a tendency to forget or skip a day altogether.

Nevertheless, speak to your doctor or pharmacist about delaying the timing of taking the pill and continuing on a post- iftar or pre- sahur schedule until the end of Ramadan [that is, after breaking the fast at sunset or before dawn].

It is important for us to remember that fasting of Ramadan is a fundamental religious obligation that we ought to observe unless we have genuine reasons to skip it. The Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) said,

“Whoever breaks a single day of Ramadan fast without valid reason will not be able to make up for the same by fasting for a lifetime” (Ahmad and An-Nasa’i)

May Allah grant us steadfastness in obedience to Him and may He accept our fasts, prayers, and good works. Ameen.

Allah Almighty knows best.

Categories
Ramadan Relationships and Marriage

Can a couple have Sexual Intercourse while Observing Optional Fast?

Question:

As-salamu `alaykum. If someone fasted Sunnah and had sexual intercourse with his spouse at the daytime, is he obliged to make kaffarah or is there any expiation for that? Thank you.

Answer by Dr. Wael Shihab

Wa `alaykum as-salamu wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh.

In the Name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful. All praise and thanks are due to Allah, and peace and blessings be upon His Messenger.

A Muslim is highly recommended to observe optional fasts to draw himself closer to Allah. If a fasting person breaks his optional fast, he is neither required to pay an expiation nor to make up for it later. It makes no difference here how he breaks his optional fast.

Responding to your question, Dr. Wael Shihab, PhD in Islamic Studies, Al-Azhar University, and the Head of the Shari`ah Dept. of Onislam.net website, stated,

Thank you for your question.

A Muslim is recommended to fast on some days— such as Mondays, Thursdays, the day of `Arafah, etc.—in order to bring himself closer to Allah Almighty.

If a Muslim breaks an optional fast—with food, drinks, or sexual intercourse with one’s spouse—he is not liable to make any kaffarah (expiation). Also, he is not required to make up for it later.

In this context, the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) said, “A person who observes an optional fast has the authority to either complete or break his fast.” (At-Tirmidhi)

However, it may be better for a fasting person not to break his optional fast to gain its great rewards.

May Allah accept your and our good deeds!

Allah Almighty knows best.

 

Categories
Ramadan Relationships and Marriage

Can Husband and Wife Sleep on One Bed While Fasting in Ramadan?

Question:

Dear scholars,  as-salamu `alaykum.

Is a fasting wife allowed to sleep next to her fasting husband without the intention of sexual intercourse? Jazakum Allah khayran.

Answer by Sheikh Ahmad Kutty

Wa`alaykum as-salamu wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh. In the Name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful. All praise and thanks are due to Allah, and peace and blessings be upon His Messenger.

There is nothing wrong for husband and wife to share a bed while both of them are fasting if they have no fear of being carried away by their desires to invalidate their fast.

In his response to your question, Sheikh Ahmad Kutty states:

There is nothing wrong for you to share the bed with your wife while both of you are fasting unless, of course, you fear that by doing so you will find yourself unable to control your desires and thus be led to invalidate your fast by engaging in sexual intercourse, in which case you are best advised against it.

We read in the traditions that the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) was once asked by a man whether he could kiss his wife while fasting, to which he replied, no, but when another man asked him the same question he told him, yes. Explaining the reason for the divergent responses, Ibn `Abbas, one of the eminent Companions of the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) said:

“The first was a young man (and the Prophet presumed that he would be carried away by his desires and thus may end up invalidating his fast by engaging in sexual intercourse), while the second was an elderly person (who he thought was in a better position to restrain himself).”

Similarly, we also read the statement of `A’ishah, the beloved wife of the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him), that the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) use to kiss his wife while fasting, but she further added, “But who among you is able to restrain his desire as the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) was wont to?”

Based on the above considerations, if you are sure of yourself and have no fear of being carried away by your desires to invalidate your fast, then you are definitely allowed to sleep in the same bed with your wife while fasting.

Allah Almighty knows best.

Categories
Ramadan Relationships and Marriage

Having Premarital Relationship during Ramadan

Question:

Respected scholars, as-salamu `alaykum.

Is it ok to make love with my boyfriend during Ramadan; that is after we break the fast? Jazakum Allahu khayran.

Answer by Sheikh Ahmad Kutty

Wa `alaykum as-salam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh.

In the Name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful.

All praise and thanks are due to Allah, and peace and blessings be upon His Messenger.

It should be stressed that having a premarital relationship is definitely prohibited whether during Ramadan or after it. So, it is our advice, dear sister, to fear Allah, come back to Him, make use of this blessed month to change your lifestyle for better in a way that pleases Allah, and to have your sins forgiven.

In his response to your question, Sheikh Ahmad Kutty, a senior lecturer and Islamic scholar at the Islamic Institute of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, states,

If you mean to ask whether you are allowed to have premarital sexual relations, the answer is definitely an emphatic no, regardless of whether one is fasting or after breaking the fast. Fornication is a most grievous sin in Islam; the sin is even graver in the month of Ramadan.

Ramadan is the month given to us to break free of all our sins and bad habits. Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) said:

“When Ramadan arrives, the doors of Heaven are opened and the doors of Hell are shut down, and the devils are chained, and an announcer will say, ‘O doer of good, come forward! O doer of bad, restrain yourself!'”

So you are best advised to use this blessed month as a time to repent and change. This is a golden opportunity, and it could be the only one you have, for who knows whether Allah will give us another chance; we never know whether we will live to see another Ramadan. We see all around us people are being called back to Allah. Death knows neither age nor status. Therefore, let us heed the warning of Allah’s Messenger:

“Woe to those who witnessed Ramadan and yet failed to get their sins pardoned (by failing to utilize the month properly).”

If, however, you are married, then of course you are allowed to have intimate spousal relations after breaking the fast. Allah says,

“It is lawful for you to go in unto your wives during the night preceding the (day’s) fast: They are as a garment for you, and you are as a garment for them} (Al-Baqarah 2:187).

Allah Almighty knows best.

 

Categories
Ramadan

Hugging One’s Spouse While Fasting in Ramadan

As-Salamu `alaykum. Are a husband and wife allowed to hug while fasting?

Jazakum Allah khayran. Answer by Sheikh Ahmad Kutty

Wa’alaykum salaam warahmatullahi wa barakatuh. All praise and thanks are due to Allah alone, and peace and blessings be upon His Messenger pbuh.

In obligatory fasts (Ramadan), one is allowed to do these only if one can control oneself. Therefore, no one who is fasting should do such things if there is a genuine risk of overstepping the boundaries. If there is no such fear, then light touching, or kissing, etc, when not accompanied by sexual desire, is permissible.

In his response to your question, Sheikh Ahmad Kutty, a senior lecturer and Islamic scholar at the Islamic Institute of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, states, Hugging your spouse in itself does not invalidate the fast; we read in the sources that the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) used to kiss his wife while fasting.

We also read that once a person asked the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) “Am I allowed to kiss my wife while fasting?” He replied, “Yes.” Hugging is comparable to kissing.

Having said this, however, I must caution you to abstain from such acts if you find yourself unable to control your desire, for as Muslims we must keep away from all such acts that may inadvertently lead to invalidating our fasts.

This is why we read in another hadith that the Prophet told another person not to kiss his spouse. In explaining the discrepancy between the two reports, Ibn `Abbas said, “The man he permitted was an older person, while the man he prohibited was a young man.”

Thus, if you have any doubt or fear of being unable to control yourself, then you should simply abstain from such actions altogether in order to save your fast. This is why the Prophet’s wife `A’ishah (may Allah be pleased with her) asked a person, ‘Who among you is capable of restraining himself as the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) had been?’

Allah Almighty knows best

hugging and kissing in Ramadan

Categories
Surah Benefits

Benefits of reciting Surah al-A’ala (The Most High)

 

There are 19 verses in this Surah al-A’ala and it was revealed in Makkah.

It is narrated that the reciter of this Surah will get the reward equal to ten times the number of letters in the divine books that were revealed to the Holy Prophet (s.a.w.), Prophet Ibrahim (a.s.) and Prophet Musa (a.s.). It is also said that in the hereafter, he will be told to enter Jannah through whichever door he pleases.

Imam Ali (a.s.) used to recite this surah often in his compulsory prayers. Surah al-A’ala is also good for relieving ear pains and other ailments.

 

Categories
Surah Benefits

Benefits of reciting Surah adh-Dhuha ( The Brightness)

 

Surah adh-Dhuha was revealed in Makkah and has 11 verses.

It is narrated from the holy Prophet (s.a.w.) that Allah (s.w.t.) is pleased with the person who recites this surah.

If recited together with name of a person who has gone missing, he will return home safe and sound.

See also: Benefits of reciting Surah Ibrahim

Also if something is forgotten somewhere by mistake, the recitation of this surah keeps its safe until you get it back in the name of Allah.

 

Categories
Relationships and Marriage

Having Intercourse with One’s Spouse whilst fasting in Ramadan

Respected scholars, assalamu `alaykum. Is it permissible to have intercourse (sex) with husband during Ramadan time?

Jazakum Allahu khayran. Answer by Sheikh Ahmad Kutty Wa`alaykum as-salamu wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh.

In the Name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful. All praise and thanks are due to Allah, and peace and blessings be upon His Messenger. A Muslim is allowed to have intercourse with his or her spouse after breaking the fast and until dawn (the time of abstention from food, drink, and gratifications).

However, one who is fasting should never overstep the boundaries of fasting by having intercourse with his or her spouse while fasting.

In his response to your question, Sheikh Ahmad Kutty, a senior lecturer and Islamic scholar at the Islamic Institute of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, states the following:

While it is forbidden to establish any conjugal relations with one’s spouse while one is fasting during the day, one is certainly allowed to do so during the night until the arrival of dawn (i.e., fajr). Allah says:

It is made lawful for you to go to your wives (in sexual relations) on the night of the fast. They are a garment for you and you are a garment for them. Allah knows that you were deceiving yourself in this respect and He has turned in mercy towards you and pardoned you. Therefore you may now have intercourse with them and seek what Allah has ordained for you. Eat and drink until the white thread (of dawn) becomes distinct to you from the black thread (of night) (Al-Baqarah 2:187).

In short, we are allowed to enjoy intimate sexual relations after breaking the fast throughout the night until the time of abstention from food, drink, and gratifications (i.e. when the time of fajr arrives).

Allah Almighty knows best.

Categories
Quran

Why many Muslims fail to read the Quran

In fact, the Holy Quran is awesome, and it is not something experienced or witnessed by only Muslims, who have a thorough appreciation for the book and who are pleased with it; it has also been labeled awesome and amazon by non-Muslims as well. In fact, even people who hate Islam very much have still called it amazon.

Now, which of the favors of your Lord will you deny? With all these wisdom, truth, proves, light and guidance that comes with the Holy Quran, are you among the queue of those who fail to read it?

Well, in this piece, I have carefully summarized some of the common excuses that people give for not reading the Holy Quran and how to go about it.

Reason one: “They don’t read The Holy Quran because it seems irrelevant to their life”

This is a very common reason why many Muslims neglect reading the Holy Quran because they think it doesn’t seem relevant in their life. So they normally don’t find the reason why they should read the Quran every day.

Our beloved Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings be upon him and his family, said:

The example of a believer who recites the Quran is that of a citrus fruit which tastes good and smells good; and one who does not recite the Quran is like a date which tastes good but has no smell. The example of a wicked person who recites the Quran is that of basil which smells good but tastes bitter; and a wicked person who does not recite the Quran is that of a vine which tastes bitter and has no smell. (Sahih Bukhari)

The importance of reciting, studying and contemplating on the verses of the Holy Qur’an cannot be stressed enough. Indeed, this great revelation has many depths and mysteries that have yet to be discovered.

Those who frequently read the Holy Qur’an can attest to the fact that it is an unending source of information and a bottomless well of fresh knowledge and guidance. Reading it repeatedly does not lead to ennui, but rather causes one to open many more avenues of thought.

This great value of the Holy Quran only should ring a bell to the one who thinks that the Quran has nothing to do with his/her life. In fact, it is relevant to everyone’s life both in this world and hereafter. Let’s embrace it wholeheartedly and we will never suffer Insha-Allah.

Reason two (2): “I don’t have time that’s why I don’t read the Quran”

This is another very common struggle that Muslims face when it comes to consistent Recitation of the Quran. People who normally use this as an excuse are workers or busy people.

A business man will say he doesn’t have enough time to read the Quran when there are meetings and businesses to attend to; A Mom with young kids will feel like there’s no time in the day to attend to the Holy Quran, etc.

Each day, your mind starts to work the moment you wake up and yawn; there are many things to do. May be that’s why you hastily did your morning prayer, you didn’t even have time to sit longer to praise the lord. You don’t even know that rushing out immediately after prayers is something odd.

Since the time at school, you had been busy every minute attending your lectures and other important issues vital to your life, which took up most of your time. You never have time for Allah. Too many things to do hence Doing Zikir are rare. For Allah, you really had no time to spare.

When you grew up and started your career, you found yourself working all day to secure your future. When you reach home, you preferred to have fun, chat with friends on the phone but didn’t border to read the Holy Quran.

You spent too much time surfing the internet, sad to say, your faith was falling flat. The only time you have left is weekends; during which you prefer window shopping with friends. You couldn’t spare time to go to the mosque; you are too busy, that’s the BIG EXCUSE.

You did your five daily prayers but always so quickly; after prayer, you don’t sit longer to reflect quietly. You don’t have time to help the needy ones; you were loaded with work as your precious time runs.

No time at all to visit a sick Muslim friend, to orphans and elderly. You hardly lent a hand; you were too busy to do community service when there were gatherings; you help the least.

Your life was already full of stress; so you didn’t counsel a Muslim in hard times or distress. You didn’t spend much time with you family because you thought, doing so is a waste of time.

No time to share with Non-Muslims about Islam; even though you know inviting cause no harm than Good. No time to do Sunnah prayers. All these contribute to your Imaan’s fall.

You are busy here and busy there; you’ve no time at all, that’s all you care. You went for religious lessons just once in a while. Because you are busy making money, you worked all day and slept all night. Too tired for Tahajjud and it seemed nothing to you.

No time at all to admire God’s creation; no time to praise Allah and seek His compassion. Although you know how short is your life. For Islam, you really didn’t strive, all because you are busy.

Finally the day comes when the Lord calls for you. You stood before Him you’re your life’s History, you feel so guilty because you should have prayed more. Isn’t that what a Muslim lives for? To thank Allah and do more good deeds? And is the Holy Quran not for us all to read?

I wonder how we will stand before Allah on the judgment day if we cannot bow before him now.

Now, on that day, you’ll start to fret; you’ve wasted your life but it’s too late to regret. Your entry to Paradise depends on your good behavior; but you’ve not done enough nor did proper prayers.

Your “Good deed book” is given from your right; an angel opened your book and read out your plight. Then the angel chided you. “Oh you Muslim servant, you are the one, who is given enough time, yet not much is done.”

Do you know that your faith is loose? Saying NO TIME is only an excuse. Your Good Deed Book should be filled up more with all the good work you stood up for. Hence you only recorded those little good deeds.

As I say this, I know your eyes will mist just like mine. As we all know where this NO TIME excuse will lead. It’s all the influence of our biggest enemy, Satan. Making us fall in love with the world so much that we forget our primary reason for being in this world.

Each one of us needs to ponder this matter very well (i.e. when I find time). We all live busy lives. Many things crowd into our daily schedules. We all know that we should make time for Allah, but we’re prone to think, “I’ll do that later, when I find time; right now I’ve got too heavy of a schedule.”

As soon as the semester is over, I’ll find time for Allah. As soon as I get through the current pressured time at work, I’ll make time for Allah. When I’m older, after I’ve had some fun in life, then I’ll make time for Allah. And so life slips by, our relationships with Allah fade from view, and with this, we miss our opportunity to gain his mercy and escape His wrath (May Allah Guide Us)

Reason three (3): “Some will say they listen to sermons every Friday, so there’s no need”

Some neglect reading the Holy Quran with the mentality that listening to weekly sermons is sufficient. Isn’t this the reason why there are scholars and Imams, to understand the Holy Quran and explain it to us on Fridays? They think.

I think every Imam or scholar will felt like a total failure if he hears people say because of His preaching they don’t read the Quran.

Why would you only want a few verses from the Quran and from someone else only once in a week, when you know that your chance of understanding is even less? When there are countless verses you could read by yourself each and every day to boost your Eeman.

What I would like to say on this is that every Muslim needs more spiritual food than one meal a week. That doesn’t work physically and it doesn’t work spiritually either.

Temptations are too relentless. Doubts are too frequent. Satan is too active. Tribulations are too heavy. Conflicts are too many. Emotions are too volatile. Perplexities are too difficult. Faith, hope and love are too threatened.

So to think you can deal with all these temptations simply from one word you got on Friday sermon? No one has ever done it, you can’t do it either and I don’t think someone can ever succeed. This cannot be used as an excuse for not reading the Quran.

Reason four (4): “It is confusing when reading the Quran”

Learning is difficult for everyone; everyone has the barrier of difficulty when it comes to learning almost everything. What is important here is HOPE and perseverance because it can make the present moment less difficult to bear. Just hold on to the belief that tomorrow will be better than today, with that in mind, you can easily bear the hardship today.

There is a quote that states that: knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers. It may not be difficult to store up in the mind vast quantity of verses within a comparatively short time, but the ability to form judgments requires the severe discipline of hard work and the tempering heat of experience and maturity.

Sometimes I am forced to ask myself whether difficulty in understanding can really be an excuse for not learning or reading the Quran. Nothing comes easy; even though, some people are God gifted when it comes to the brain and wisdom. But others have to suffer a lot before the meaning can come.

But how many times have you tried hard to understand the Quran? Did you just quite as soon as things are becoming difficult? Everybody needs a teacher, are you doing it alone or you are doing it with a teacher?

The simple and sad fact is that most of us give up too soon.

Every scholar you can think of faced lots of challenges on his/her way to success. Nothing really comes easy my fellow Muslims brothers and sisters. Imagine our Imams and scholars all had given up because of the difficulties or challenges they faced in understanding the Quran and Sunnah, what would have happen to this Religion of Allah (ISLAM)?

Therefore we all as Muslims need to take the Quran serious; it is what we’ve got. The only Book that is free from all kind of contradictions and errors. We were blessed to have it, that’s why we must celebrate it by reading it each day.

One important thing, let’s not forget to share this important information to others, sharing is caring. I hope you agree with me on this. And Allah knows best.

 

 

Categories
Uncategorized

Beautiful hadith on generosity in the month of Ramadan

Narrated Ibn ‘Abbas: Allah’s Apostle was the most generous of all the people, and he used to reach the peak in generosity in the month of Ramadan when Gabriel met him. Gabriel used to meet him every night of Ramadan to teach him the Qur’an. Allah’s Apostle was the most generous person, even more generous than the strong uncontrollable wind (in readiness and haste to do charitable deeds).

(Sahih Bukhari Volume 1, Book 1, Number 5)